Skyscraper : Review

Will Sawyer (Dwayne Johnson – Rampage, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle), ex-FBI hostage rescue team leader, US war veteran, and father, is on assignment in Hong Kong to assess the security of in the world’s tallest, safest building. Yet, he soon finds himself in trouble, and trying to escape both the hired guns of a master criminal, local authorities, and having to rescue his wife Sarah (Neve Campbell) and children, Georgia (McKenna Roberts) and Henry (Noah Cottrell) in the building, now ablaze.

So, what does one expect from a movie named Skyscraper, starring action man The Rock? It’s action, fights, stunts, and disaster from start to finish. Yes, Dwayne Johnson can act, but in Skyscraper we’re not bothered by complex plots or drama. We get non-stop adrenaline, super-human feats, and over the top heroes. We get one fast paced ride that is sure to thrill. And we get some nostalgia, taking us back to the action movies of the 80s and 90s. We get fun.

Skyscraper has a pretty straight forward plot. Nothing too intricate, yet still plausible (save for some death defying stunts, of course). It’s an escape from the daily drudgery of life, and a chance to relax and be thrilled.

Have we seen this before? Probably. It’s modern, yet one can see echos of Die Hard, The Towering Inferno, and countless template movies. But, this is still not one to miss.

Other than Johnson, it’s great to see Neve Campbeel take an outing on the big screen once again, with her talent not on show nearly enough.

Skyscraper, a fast paced, fun filled ride. Worthy of cheer, and thrilling to the very end.

Skyscraper opens 13 July 2018 in South African cinemas.

Ant-Man And The Wasp (3D) : Review

Following the events of Ant-Man, and further along, Captain America: Civil War, Scott Lang / Ant-Man (Paul Rudd – Sausage Party, Ant-Man) is now suffering the consequences of the decisions he made, and the support he lent to be a hero. Yet, Lang is also fighting another battle, that of family and father.

Soon, he is approached very persuasively, by Hope van Dyne / Wasp (Evangeline Lilly – The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug) and her father, Dr. Hank Pym (Michael Douglas – Last Vegas) with an mission that will ripple through the world of many, affecting countless lives, as Lang must now not only overcome personal obstacles, but needs to learn to work as a team as the choices of the past catch up to all.

Ant-Man and the Wasp, while possible to watch with one’s only background being the first Ant-Man film, forms part of the greater Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), meaning that there are not only many references in the story, based on its placement in time, but several small, and some large, setups that will forward the MCU major story arch, as a whole. Most certainly, the aforementioned films would stand one in good stead, to watch. As would the recent Avengers: Infinity War.

While the film is an adventure, it contains the usual small dose of inter-personal drama, and plenty of humour. Played out with a plethora of locations, and imaginative plot devices, manifested by some amazing special effects. A thoroughly engrossing story, that will both thrill and entertain. As with all films in the MCU, stay for the end credit scenes. You’ve been warned.

As entertaining as Ant-Man and the Wasp is, a word of caution. This is best seen in a decent cinema, where the staff care about the viewer experience, and not a cinema where after many complaints, they are as yet still unable to screen a 3D movie. With a preview screening at Cavendish being so dark that many scenes were closer to listening to radio. And yet being so dark, things got progressively darker towards the right of screen, where the image then bled off the screen. How, in these modern times, with technology and technicians, can this not be fixed? Simple solution, avoid this cinema. They don’t want to show a film properly, so go elsewhere. With tickets costing a pretty penny, why should consumers suffer? It’s not a dark film, it’s a poor quality cinema.

That being said, if one could actually see the film properly, it is a fun film, and well worth an evening out with the family for some Marvel enjoyment.

Ant-Man and the Wasp opens 6 July 2018 in South African cinemas.

Justice League (DVD) : Review

Film

Following on closely to the events depicted in Batman vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, Bruce Wayne / Batman (Ben Affleck – The AccountantSuicide Squad) is on a quest to unite a group of special people, possessing unique abilities and powers, drawing inspiration from Superman’s (Henry Cavill) sacrifice, and selfless act. As the world faces a grave dangers, and a powerful enemy from a time long past, Steppenwolf (Ciarán Hinds – Frozen).

Joining this intrepid group of metahumans, is Batman’s newfound ally, Diana Prince / Wonder Woman (Gal Gadot – Wonder WomanTriple 9), to face an even greater enemy. Barry Allen / The Flash (Ezra Miller – Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them) is on-board, with Arthur Curry / Aquaman (Jason Momoa), and Victor Stone / Cyborg (Ray Fisher) rounding off the list.

With all the many characters brought together in one story, and the fast pace at which we are introduced to each, especially for viewers new to these characters and this world, rewatch value is rather high on the film given that the film is both a good story and contains a lot of information and action thrown at the user in one go.

Of course, one could not let a DC Universe collection exist without the addition of this latest outing of the heroes, so yet another reason to get a copy.

Read the full SAMDB review of Justice League.

Disc

Overall, the disc is of a good technical quality, with a fun main feature.

Justice League is available now, to purchase on disc, in South Africa.

Video

Video is encoded at a decent average bitrate, with no visible artefacts on-screen. There is also no visible colour bleed. Details in darker scenes is good, as with the many faster paced action sequences.

Viewers with the necessary hardware or software could scale up to a larger or higher resolution screen, should they wish.

Video for the bonus feature is a bit more compressed, leaving more space for a higher bitrate on the main feature. However, that being said, while the disc is dual layer, there is still an amount of free space on the disc that could have been utilised.

The menus are very compressed, at low bitrates, but this poses no issue, as this is merely to navigate with.

Audio

Audio is encoded at a high constant bitrate, and presented in a Dolby Digital 5.1 mix. Dialogue is clear via the centre speaker. The audio stage is very broad, with great use of discreet mixing to both front and surround channels, greatly expanding the on-screen world, and placing the viewer in the midst of the action.

Audio for the bonus feature on the disc is presented only as a stereo 2.0 soundtrack.

Navigation

Navigation is simple, and easy to use. The main menu is static, with a background poster and accompanying music. There are text links to play the main feature, scene selections, languages, and special feature.

The scene selection sub-menus each contain six medium sized colour, static thumbnails, for a total of twelve chapters. While these are numbered, they are not labelled, nor is there any package insert listing with chapter names or descriptions.

The languages sub-menu has a text list of available audio languages, including English descriptive audio, and a list of available subtitle languages, including English for the deaf or hard of hearing.

The special feature (singular) sub-menu has just one text item, to play the included special feature on the disc.

Bonus Features

Road to Justice – This feature talks about how the heroes have teamed up, covering from the Justice Society to the Justice League, with insightful input from the creators and filmmakers.

A fun trip down memory lane, that should appeal to any lover of the DC Universe or the DC Comics. A nice addition.

Packaging

Packaging is rather standard on the DVD, with a poster on the front, with title. There are no cast names, but these should be known to almost everyone by now.

The back of the packaging has a few small poster type images, showing one hero per poster. There is a short synopsis, and the usual technical information too.

There are no package inserts, such as chapter listing.

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom : Review

The volcanoes on the island of Isla Nublar have laid dormant for ages, but recently have begun to show signs of activity. At the behest of Benjamin Lockwood (James Cromwell), Owen Grady (Chris Pratt – Avengers: Infinity War, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2) and Claire Dearing (Bryce Dallas Howard – Gold) mount an expedition that will attempt to rescue the remaining dinosaurs from the island, saving them from this extinction-level event.

Following on some time after the events of the first Jurassic World, and moving away from the seclusion and isolation of the island, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom takes a rather different approach. Gone is the awe and wonder of the park, as we are very soon plunged into the disarray that is the fight between good and evil intent.

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom focuses more on the people than the creatures themselves, as we follow some developing characters, each with their own agenda, dealing with a whole host of newly engineered dinosaurs, and the increased dangers and threat that accompany those, as man tries to tame an invention from a species that long ago wandered the earth.

The effects and creatures in the film are spectacular. But be warned, as many South African cinemas have neither the intent, nor the technical ability it seems, to actually screen a film properly, in 2D or 3D. The screens are just far too dark, robbing the audience of much of the experience and visual splender. It’s not just a shame, but rather pathetic customer service. Do not allow them to take your money for such an abysmal display of customer service. If you can’t see the 3D, get a refund.

Cinema issues aside, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is a fun film. Yes, there are a few cheesy moments, yes it moves a bit slow at times. But it’s not some dramatic epic. It’s an adventure, an escape, and a way to unwind. Certainly a fun film for everyone.

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom opens 8 June 2018 in South African cinemas.

Suicide Squad: Hell To Pay (DVD) : Review

Film

Task Force X, of Suicide Squad fame, is tasked with stealing a mystical, powerful object, once again needing to risk life and limb, and possibly betrayal, to make the world a better place.

With the voice talents of Christian Slater (Hot Tub Time Machine 2), Vanessa Williams, and Tara Strong (Batman: Gotham by Gaslight, Gnome Alone), to name a few, there is no shortage of talent in this film. As with Batman: Attack on Arkham, it bests its namesake, to deliver a fun film, expanding on the DC Universe, and showing us that, yes, we can get a good movie, with these characters.

While the animation in the film is rather simplistic, waving photorealism in favour of more comic book style, the film is by no means a children’s film, staving off the watered down depictions of kiddies movies, and presenting the viewer with an adult film, with adult themes, and one devoid of childish detour.

Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay has a similar visual style to Batman: Gotham by Gaslight, however lacking the nostalgic appeal that movie delivers. However, it does bring its own to the table, and deliver a thoroughly entertaining and engrossing action story, with our favourite anti-heroes.

A fun jaunt into the DC Universe, and an entertaining movie, all in one.

Disc

Overall, the disc is of an average technical quality. Both video and audio might have benefitted from a higher bitrate encoding, and audio might have been more encompassing had there been more discrete use of the surround channels.

Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay is available now, to purchase on disc, in South Africa.

Video

Video is encoded at a decent average bitrate, with no visible artefacts on-screen.  While there is no visible colour bleed, some colour does feel slightly washed out, lacking vibrance, and some scenes do feel a bit soft due to compression. Darker scenes do maintain adequate detail.

Scaling up to a larger or higher resolution screen would depend on the scaling method used, but viewers with the necessary hardware or software might find that the restrictions imposed by a lower bitrate might become more obvious.

Audio

Sound is encoded at a decent average bitrate, and presented in a Dolby Digital 5.1 mix. Dialogue is clear via the centre channel, with most of the weight of the soundtrack carried by the front channels. Surround channels are not used much, other than to create a small amount of additional ambience, with almost no discernable discrete audio used here.

Navigation

Navigation is simple, and easy to follow. The main menu is static, with accompanying music, and the films poster as background image.

There are text links to play the main feature, languages, and special features.

The languages sub-menu has text links to pick the desired audio languages, and desired subtitles. There are subtitles in English for the deaf or hearing impaired.

The special features sub-menu has text links to the three included special features.

Bonus Features

There are three special features included on the disc, with each short clip being not just a trailer, but an introduction to each of The Death of Superman, Batman: Assualt on Arkham, and Superman/Batman: Public Enemies.

These are not just mere trailers, but rather including short sound bites from the filmmakers themselves, giving their own take on teasing each film.

While these may not actually be bonus features for a film, per say, they are still a nice inclusion on the disc, and should whet the appetite for any DC fans.

Packaging

Packaging is pretty standard for the disc, with a poster, with title on the front. On the back of the packaging are a few stills from the main feature, a short synopsis, a listing of bonus features (in an incredibly small font), and the usual technical information.

There are no package inserts, such as chapter listing.

 

The Man With The Iron Heart (DVD) : Review

Film

It’s 1942, and German fascists are expanding their borders, and The Third Reich is at its peak. Two young recruits, Jozef Gabcik (Jack Reynor – Detroit, Free Fire) and Jan Kubis (Jack O’Connell – Money Monster), of the Czech resistance in London are tasked with travelling to Prague and assassinating Nazi leader, Reich-protector Reinhard Heydrich (Jason Clarke – Everest, Terminator Genisys), head of the SS, the Gestapo, and the architect behind the “Final Solution”.

Despite Hydrich’s stoic outer appearance, life at home mirrors his inner turmoil. He all but ignores his wife, Lina Von Osten (Rosamund Pike – A United Kingdom), and he is under ever more pressure to please Hitler.

The Man with the Iron Heart is a harsh look at the hatred and ideals of the time before and during World War 2. The hardened hearts and mislead minds of those seeking to rid the world of an entire population group. The film takes a close look at both the emotions and actions of everyone involved, showing both the perpetrators and victims of these evil deeds, and while not sensationalising the violence, it does not shy away from the pain it caused, nor the emotion involved.

With all the drama, there are some scenes of tension, and some of action, which are delivered with just the right balance each time, rounding up a plot that sucks the viewer in as the characters develop and become better known to us.

A gritty war film, focusing on the drama of a small part of that time, presented by talented filmmakers and actors. An engrossing tale, that evokes both emotion and debate. Well worth watching.

Disc

Over all the disc is of a good technical quality, with an engrossing main feature to watch.

The Man with the Iron Heart is available now, to purchase on disc, in South Africa.

Video

Video is encoded at a high average bitrate, with no visible artefacts on-screen, nor any colour bleed evident. Detail is good in darker scenes.

Viewers with the relevant hardware or software could scale up to a larger screen, or higher resolution, should they wish.

Audio

Main audio is presented in a Dolby Digital 5.1 mix, with a stereo 2.0 downmix available. Dialogue is clear via the centre speaker, with much of the weight of the soundtrack carried via the front channels, and music taking front left and right. The surround channels serve to expand the front channel sound stage, with not much discrete audio being sent to them, but allowing them to expand the on-screen action, helping to further draw the viewer into the story.

Navigation

Navigation is simple, and easy to follow. The main menu is static, with accompanying background music. There are text links to play the main feature, and to access a scenes sub-menu. Yellow highlights the current selection, should viewers wish to know.

The scenes sub-menus each contain six small, motion, colour thumbnails, for a total of twelve chapters. While these are numbered, they are not labelled, nor is there any chapter listing insert in the disc packaging, making navigation to a particular part of the main feature a bit of guesswork. Viewers would be better off using their own hardware or software to create bookmarks.

Bonus Features

There are no bonus features on the disc, apart from trailers for I, Tonya, Final Portrait, and 24 Hours to Live.

While these trailers can be fast-forward or skipped individually, they can not be accessed again via the disc menu system.

Packaging

Packaging is pretty standard, with a poster on the front of the case, with title and main cast. The rear of the casing has a few stills from the main feature, a short synopsis, and the usual technical information.

There are no package inserts, such as chapter listings, included in the packaging.

 

Sniper: Ultimate Kill (DVD) : Review

Film

Marine sniper Brandon Beckett (Tom Berenger), along with DEA agent Kate Estrada (Danay Garcia) are sent to Colombia to capture drug kingpin Jesús Morales (Juan Sebastian Calero) for return to the US, and kill El Diablo (Felipe Calero), and the sniper hired by Morales to eliminate his competition.

The film makes a brave attempt at a top notch action feature, and so falls solidly into the category of lazy afternoon fun, when one does not want to exert oneself following an intricate plot. While the characters are well acted, as with films like this, they have very little substance to them.

The action scenes are very low key, apart from one or two kills via sniper, which has the camera linger for a while. This aside, the climax of the film itself is quite a letdown, building no tension, and providing no satisfaction for the viewer, with the incredibly hollow characters in the movie.

Sniper: Ultimate Kill is a run of the mill, low budget action, that would possibly appeal to fans of the genre, but not that many others. Watch it if you’re really bored.

Disc

Overall, the disc is technically average., and a dual-layer disc. It is, however, a pity that the bitrate on video was not a bit higher, as there is very little of the second layer used, meaning much more space was in fact available for use.

Sniper: Ultimate Kill is available now, to purchase on disc, in South Africa.

Video

Video is encoded at a decent average bitrate. There are no visible artefacts on-screen, but in some more detailed scenes, there is a small amount of colour bleed evident. Colours could be a bit more vibrant, as they tend to feel a bit washed out at times. Details in darker scenes is adequate.

Viewers with the necessary hardware or software could scale up to a larger or higher resolution screen, should they wish.

Audio

Audio is encoded at decent bitrate, and presented in a Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack. Dialogue is clear via the centre speaker, with the weight of the soundtrack carried via the front channels. The surround channels carry ambient sounds, and could have been used a bit more for discrete sounds.

Navigation

Navigation is simple, and easy to follow. The main menus is static, with accompanying background music. There are text links to play the main feature, for languages, scene selections, and to play the disc previews again.

The languages sub-menu has a text list of audio languages to choose from, and a list of subtitles, including for the for the hearing impaired. There are several subtitle menus, with a long list of languages to choose from.

The scene selection sub-menus each contain four large, still, colour thumbnails, for a total of sixteen chapters. Navigation between the chapter sub-menus is via a forward or backward arrow navigation button, with a button in the shape of a sniper reticle used to return to the main menu.

While the various chapter thumbnails are numbered, they are not labelled, nor is there any information provided via a package insert, so navigating to a particular part of the main feature would require some guesswork, or for the viewer to use their own hardware or software bookmarks.

Bonus Features

There are no bonus features, except trailers for Starship Troopers: Traiter of Mars, and Resident Evil: Vendetta, which autoplay at the beginning of the disc.

These can be individually skipped, or fast forward. They can also be accessed again via the main disc menu.

Packaging

Packaging for the disc is rather standard, with a poster, film title, and main cast listing on the front. On the back are a few stills from the main feature, a short synopsis, and some of the usual technical information found on most disc packages.

There are no package inserts, such as chapter listing.

 

Kidnap (DVD : Review

Film

A straight-forward, simple story, if even a bit cliched. A mother, Karla Dyson (Halle Berry – X-Men: Days of Future Past)  is going through a divorce. She takes her son, Frankie (Sage Correa), to a park, and while on her phone arguing, the child is kidnapped. She sees him getting into a car, in the distance, and gives chase, with the entire film following this chase, mostly by car, and at times on foot.

A very simple story, devoid of any twists, but also devoid of any substance. Karla drives like a maniac, causing many terrible accidents along the road as she goes, and is constantly talking to herself or to the not present Frankie in the most annoying way. This is likely for want of exposition, to help the audience, or just to fill the scene with some dialogue while she careens down various highways.

So little background or backstory is given to either the protagonists or antagonists, that one eventually just wishes they whole lot would be captured, and we can be done with a rather boring film that falls way short of anything to do with a thriller or action piece.

This terrible B-grade film is a long way from the Oscar winning roles of Halle Berry. A film without any substance.

Disc

Overall, the disc for Kidnap is of a very high technical standard, however with no bonus material, and a main feature story that is likely to infuriate more than entertain.

Kidnap is available now, to purchase on disc, in South Africa.

Video

Video is encoded at a high average bitrate, far higher than most other DVD discs. There are no visible on-screen artefacts, nor any colour bleed. Colour are rich and vibrant where needed, and detail in the few darker scenes is excellent.

There are many fast paced scenes in the film, and with the incredibly high bitrate, these look excellent. The video image scaled up to a larger and higher resolution screen looks great too, although results may vary depending on the hardware or software up-scaling method.

Audio

Audio is encoded at a high average bitrate, and presented in a Dolby Digital 5.1 mix, with a stereo 2.0 downmix. Switching between these two can only be done via hardware or software selection on the player, and not via the disc menu.

Dialogue is clear via the centre speaker, with the front channels used for environmental audio and music. The surrounds are used to great effect throughout the film, to expand the on-screen world and further draw the viewer into the action. The rear channels carry a significant amount of discrete audio.

Navigation

Navigation is simple, and easy to follow. The main menu is static, with accompanying background music. There are text links to play the main feature, and for scene selection. Red is highlighted here, as some viewers may be unsure.

The scene selection sub-menus each have four small, motion, colour thumbnails each, for a total of twenty chapters. While these are numbered, they are not labelled, neither is there a chapter listing insert in the packaging. This would mean that navigating to a particular part of the main feature would require some guesswork. Viewers would be better of creating their own bookmarks using their hardware or software player.

Bonus Features

There are no bonus features on the disc, except for trailers to Wonder Wheel, Megan Leavey, and Breath. These autoplay at the beginning of the disc, and while they can be fast-forward or skipped individually, they can not be accessed again via the disc menu system.

Packaging

Packaging is pretty standard, with a poster, title and cast name listing on the front. The back has a few stills from the film, a short synopsis, and the usual technical information about the disc.

There are no package inserts, such as chapter listing, included.

 

Nommer 37 : Review

The Cape Flats, apartment Nommer 37, home to Randel Hendricks (Irshaad Ally), and his girlfriend Pam (Monique Rockman). Randel is paralysed through some tragic crime incident, so to help alleviate the stigma of being wheelchair bound, Pam buys him a set of binoculars.

However, as things go in poor, crime-ridden communities, Randel is in debt to Emmie (Danny Ross), a loan shark, and all round garbage. So, when Randel witnesses a murder by local thug Lawyer (David Manual), he decides to pit bad against bad, criminal against criminal, in a black mail scheme to come by the money to settle his debt. Putting both his life, and Pam’s, on the line, things soon spiral out of control.

Nommer 37 has a simple, contained setting, with a small, yet talented ensemble cast bringing the characters to life. Shot on location in the Cape Flats, this is both an engrossing story, and a small taste of the life itself.

There are genuine tense moments, where one is tempted to stand up and yell at the screen, in a bid to help the protagonist, willing with the mind for the dastardly villains to get their come-comeuppance. And yet, the tension is tempered with moments of humour, some of which may be lost if one is not familiar with the “taal” (slang) spoken on The Flats.

The intricate plot does indeed resolve, with a few twists and turns along the way, making for a fun, dramatic, at times funny, but totally entertaining film. Nommer 37 is a must see film, that is just waiting to share a piece of our culture with the rest of the world.

Nommer 37 opens 1 June 2018 in South African cinemas.

Read more about Nommer 37.

Mother (DVD) : Review

Film

Known simply as Mother (Jennifer Lawrence – PassengersX-Men: Apocalypse) and Him (Javier Bardem) a couple’s relationship is put to the ultimate test a stranger, Man (Ed Harris – In Dubious BattleGravity) arrives, and stays the night at their house. Soon after his wife, Woman (Michelle Pfeiffer), joins him. The uninvited guests disrupt their tranquil existence, with more and more people arriving as things begin to spiral more and more out of control, bringing with them their own strife.

With the cerebral nature of the film, it most certainly warrants multiple viewings, with each subsequent rewatch giving the viewer more insight into a possible interpretation of the story, the characters, and the ever changing visual narrative.

Mother! is one of those films that was hated by some, loved by many, yet is is a great piece of filmmaking, presented by a talented cast, and one that is sure to evoke debate for years to come.

Read the full SAMDB review on Mother!

Disc

Overall, the disc could be better technically, with the video being a bit too compressed, where there is still some space left on the disc, that could have been used for a higher bitrate on the video.

The main feature is one of those films that one either loves or hates, yet is a great piece of film work non-the-less.

Mother! is available now, to purchase on disc, in South Africa.

Video

Video is encoded at a below average bitrate, leaving some visible artefacts on-screen, however, given the constant camera movement, this is not all that easy to see. Colours are not vibrant, and there are some areas where there are small amounts of colour bleed evident. Darker scenes look slightly washed out, and lacking in detail.

While this could be scaled up to a higher resolution screen, coupling this with a larger screen would merely make the visual artefacts all that more evident. A pity, as a lot of the film depends on the visual narrative as the story progresses.

Audio

Audio is encoded at a decent average bitrate, and presented in a Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack. Dialogue is present and clear on the front and centre channels, with the surround channels serving to expand the on-screen world with more ambient sound.

Navigation

The main menu is static, easy to follow, and with a background image, with no accompanying music. There are text links to play the main feature, audio options, subtitles, special features, and scene selections.

The audio options sub-menu has a text list of the various audio languages, including descriptive audio in English.

The subtitles sub-menus have text lists for the subtitle choices, including English for the hearing impaired.

The special features menu has text links for the two bonus features.

The scene selection sub-menus each have four large colour, still thumbnails, for a total of twenty chapters. While these are large, and numbered, they are not labelled, nor listed on a package insert in the casing, meaning that navigating to a particular part of the film may require some guesswork. It may be best to create ones own bookmarks in hardware or software, when playing.

Bonus Features

Mother! The Downward Spiral – A behind the scenes look at the making of Mother! and how the filmmakers achieved the changing look and feel of the film.

This is a rather lengthy feature, full of interesting information about story and the filming process. Some very insightful input from the filmmakers, including the actors sharing about their respective characters, and the various on-screen relationships.

This is a great bonus feature to have on a disc, just going by the plethora of information and access it provides. A great addition for viewers and filmmakers alike.

The Makeup FX Of Mothers – A brief look at the various practical effects for make-up used in the film, and a behind the scenes look at their creation, including the animatronics used in the film. While brief, this featurette does provide some interesting information.

There is also a trailer for the TV series Twin Peaks, that auto-plays at the beginning of the disc. This can be skipped, or fast-forwarded. There is also a polite message prior to this, stating that you can directly access the main disc menu, should you wish.

Packaging

Packaging is pretty standard, with a poster, title and main cast on the front. On the back are some stills from the main feature, a brief synopsis, a listing of languages, subtitles, and the bonus features. There is also the usual technical information provided.

The packaging does not contain any inserts, such as chapter listing.